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Oral Treatment for Foot Infections

By: Jo Johnson - Updated: 16 May 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Treatment Medication Drugs Research Feet

There are many ways of treating infections, some conventionally whilst others are complimentary or based on ancient cultural practices.To treat something orally usually means that a medicine is taken via the mouth and absorbed into the body often through the gastro-intestinal tract.

What Sort of Infections Can Occur to the Feet?

The most common type of foot infection is that of a fungal nature. These fungal infections may include athlete's foot, nail infections or those that cause blistering to the skin.

If you have a wound on the foot from having surgery or from ill-fitting shoes of similar, there is a chance that an infection may develop. This occurs as bacteria develop within the wound, multiplying and affecting the tissues causing pain, oozing and swelling to the wound. If this occurs it is likely that you will need medical attention, often requiring the use of anti-biotic treatments and wound care.

In some instances a variety of foot disorders that are not treated effectively or neglected may cause and infection to develop. Complaints such as bunions, corns and calluses may increase in severity causing the skin to breakdown and an infection to set in.Again these instances usually need professional attention.

What Oral Treatments are Available?

Most people are familiar with the types of anti-fungal preparations seen regularly in the chemists or the supermarket, but when these fail it is possible to receive a prescription for an oral anti-fungicidal treatment from your doctor. These are very effective at treating fungal infections and are frequently used as a second line of treatment for such disorders.

Research has proved that though these medications are effective, the costs weighed up against their routine usage over that of powder or spray forms of anti-fungal treatment cannot be justified so they remain being used as a second stage of treatment.

There is a fairly wide selection of oral anti-fungicides which share the common term of being classed as 'azoles' due to this term being found at the end of each of the drugs name.

If a bacterial infection has developed your GP is likely to assess the need for anti-biotic therapy and prescribe as necessary. As with all medications, even if the infection seems to have reduced or even healed entirely, it is vital that the full course is taken as directed in order to ensure that all infected cells have been eliminated even those that cannot be seen or felt.

If the infection has not been cured after the antibiotics have been finished you should return to your GP who may suggest taking a sample from the wound and sending it off for analysis to determine the nature of the infection and therefore determine the most appropriate line of treatment.Along with the medications given to fight the infection, it may also be necessary to take a painkiller to reduce discomfort during the healing period. This may be something like paracetamol or a prescription drug that has been deemed necessary by your doctor. Those with extensive infections with deep wounds are likely to fall into this category.

Who is Most at Risk of Foot Infection?

Those who are most at risk of suffering from a foot infection include those who do not maintain the hygiene and welfare of their feet, those who are diabetic, those who do not protect their feet from trauma and injury and those who continually wear ill-fitting or inappropriate shoes without letting the feet rest and relax frequently.

It is very important to prevent foot infections and this prevention may be actions as simple as regular bathing and drying of the feet, getting your feet measured so you can buy the correct sized footwear or even ensuring your feet are protected from injury.

Infections of the feet may occur for a number of reasons, each necessitating its own form of treatment. Some of these treatments may be received orally whilst others may require a different route of administration.

If you are concerned about your feet and believe that you have symptoms of an infection, please see your GP or a chiropodist for an assessment, diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.

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